PTSD and Avoidance

Avoidance is often one of the symptoms of PTSD. With avoidance, we do whatever we can to avoid thinking about or feeling emotions concerning the stressful events we have experienced. When avoidance is extreme, or when it is our primary coping mechanism, it can interfere with recovery and healing.

Emotional avoidance occurs when you try to avoid thoughts or feelings connected to a traumatic event. For example, your thoughts are racing about something traumatic that happened and you decide, “I’m just not going to think about that now.” While we may go to great lengths to avoid thinking about the event, it is often necessary in order for us to process it and move on.

Behavioral avoidance occurs when you work to avoid reminders of the trauma.  An example of this would be avoiding places where you may hear something that reminds you of what happened.

While not all avoidance is bad, it becomes a problem when it is your primary way of dealing with trauma. Therapy can help you learn to deal with your thoughts and feelings without becoming overwhelmed by them or resorting to excessive avoidance.

 

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